Reconstruction and analysis of past transport networks and human movement in GIS

, 9:45 am to

Venue: Kulturwissenschaftliches Zentrum (KWZ), Heinrich-Düker-Weg 14, Seminarraum KWZ 0.607

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GIS has become an attractive and powerful tool for spatial analysis. In the context of Digital Humanities and their research questions GIS slowly finds its way into humanities. In archaeology GIS is used for documentation purposes, but new approaches use GIS for example to reconstruct most probable historical paths and roads or to analyse the time it took to get commodities and information from one place to another. This workshop deals with GIS as a tool of historical research and focusses on methods and possibilities of analysis.

The first presentation will regard the creation of a Historical GIS (“HGIS”) map of the Hanseatic League road network around 1500 and the methods of a consequential geographical and historical analysis of this network, that is the development of a GIS model able to estimate the cost in terms of time for transportation along the road network.

The two other presentations by Prof. Philip Verhagen (VU University Amsterdam) and Dr. Francesco Ferrarese (University of Padua) deal with the digital reconstruction of a probable road network along the Roman limes and the analysis of human movement in a reconstructed prehistoric landscape in northern Italy. You can find the abstracts of their presentations below and attached their papers related to the workshop.

This workshop is organized in the context of Mauricio N. Vergara’s fellowship at the Campus Laboratory Digitization and Computational Analytics of the University of Göttingen.

Dr. Mauricio N. Vergara
Campuslaboratory DCA/ Göttingen Center for Digital Humanities

Dr. Niels Petersen
Institut für Historische Landesforschung der Universität Göttingen

 

Venue

Kulturwissenschaftliches Zentrum, Heinrich-Düker-Weg 14, Seminarraum KWZ 0.607

https://lageplan.uni-goettingen.de/?ident=5312_6_EG_0.607

 

Program

  

9:45

 

Welcome and Introduction

10:00 -10:45

Mauricio Vergara

Creation of an H-GIS for the Hanseatic League road network and the geo-historical analysis

10:45 - 11:30

Philip Verhagen

Reconstructing local transport networks in the Dutch Roman limes using least-cost paths and network analysis techniques

11:30 - 12:15

Francesco Ferrarese

Action GIS. A predictive and postdictive model for human movement in an ancient hilly landscape

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch

(Turmzimmer, Mensa am Turm)

14:00 - 15:00

Open discussion

 

Abstracts

Reconstructing local transport networks in the Dutch Roman limes using least-cost paths and network analysis techniques (Philip Verhagen and Mark Groenhuijzen)

In this paper, I will discuss methodological, theoretical and practical issues of applying network reconstruction and analysis techniques for the understanding of local transport networks in the Dutch part of the Roman limes zone. Research into transport and movement in the area has mostly focused on the military roads and fluvial system. The secondary road systems, however, which connected the rural settlements to the military and urban centres, have mostly escaped attention. Network construction techniques based on least-cost paths were applied to reconstruct the most plausible transport network in the area. The analysis of this network then allowed us to address questions about the position of local rural settlements with regard to the military centres and its implications for the development of a system of local provisioning of the forts.

Action GIS. A predictive and postdictive model for human movement in an ancient hilly landscape
(Anita Casarotto, Armando De Guio, Francesco Ferrarese and Giovanni Leonardi)

In this study we present a predictive (or postdictive) model to simulate a human movement through an ancient landscape in the Eastern Lessinia (Northeastern Italy) during different Prehistoric Ages. The aim is to calculate, using GIS tools, the optimal pathway to link settlements each other, considering some environmental factors that could have affected human decisions. By exploiting GIS suitability maps, it has been possible to predict (postdict) the paths more suitable in the reconstructed landscape. This methodology could provide a powerful tool for Cultural Resource Management, even if limitations persist in this kind of models.

Papers relevant to the workshop

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/ifkwqg689gxrj7t/AADzhToYbt0ZcYpHv5Y6quWva?dl=0